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Full text of "Sewing without mother's help; a story sewing book for beginners"

1 




EWING 

Without 

Mothers Help 



WHAT I 

fA^bbWlTH 

. MY.HaHDS 




CLARAINbRAM JUDSON 

___JI111-MJ Mil— ■■■■■! mil ■■■■> TT* 



MHMsnwui 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 




Ell I = s t) a.1 K CTca I ta C3 >- r-i i 

Cutting the Apron pattern. Lesson 1. 



SEWING WITHOUT 
MOTHER'S HELP 

A Story Sewing' Book 
for Beginners 

BY 

.WCLARA INGRAM JUDSON 

AUTHOR OF 

COOKING WITHOUT MOTHER's HELP, FLOWER FAIRIES, 

BILLY ROBIN AND HIS NEIGHBORS, GOOD-NIGHT 

STORIES, BEDTIME TALES, THE MART 

JANE SERIES, AND OTHER WORKS 



NEW YORK 

THE NOURSE COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 






Copyright, 1921, 
BY 

THE NOURSE COMPANY 



MAR 10 1921 
©CU608609 



To ALICE, 

WHOSE HELP IN EXPERIMENT 
MADE THIS BOOK WHAT IT IS 



CONTENTS 

LESSON PAGE 

I. Making an Apron 9 

11. A Handkerchief Bag and Hand- 
kerchief 21 

Handkerchief Bag .... 25 

Handkerchief 27 

III. Making a Knitting Bag ... 33 

IV. Doll Underwear 43 

Shirt 49 

Panties 50 

V. Making a Doll Dress .... 55 

VI. Making a Doll Cape and Hat . G'^ 

Cape 69 

Hat 70 

VII. Making Doll Bedding ... 75 

Sheets 79 

Pillow and Slips .... 79 

Blanket 81 

Comfort 81 

Spread 82 

VIII. Making a Skirt to Wear with 

Middies 85 

IX. Making a Nightgown ... 99 

X. Making A Kimono Ill 

XI. Making a Cook's Cap and Apron 121 

Cap 126 

Apron 127 

XII. Making a "Slip-On" House Dress 133 




STITCH EDGING ON 
THESE TURNEDIN SIDES 



LESSON 1. 
MAKING AN APRON. 

Alice Gerald hung up the receiver with 
more of a bang than was necessary and 
turned a disappointed face toward her 
mother and sister. 

"Her mother's away and she can't come," 
she announced. 

"Well, then," said Mary, "we'll have to 
plan something else." 

"But a cooking party was such a good 
idea," objected Alice, "and it just fits with 
an unexpected vacation like to-day. It isn't 
[9] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

nearly as much fun for you and me to go out 
and cook lunch, when we already know how 
to do it, as it would be to teach Frances; 
you know that yourself, Mary. It's some- 
thing new, that's the fun." 

"Then why not do something new your- 
selves?" suggested Mrs. Gerald, as she 
folded up the last bit of mending and set 
her work basket away. "It isn't as tho 
you knew everytJiingT she added, with a 
twinkle in her eye. 

"Yes, but you said you had work that 
had to be done this morning so you can't 
teach us and what should we learn any- 
way?" 

"How about sewing?" asked Mrs. Gerald. 

''Really sewing — making something, do 
you mean, mother?" asked Alice eagerly. 
"Making something for ourselves?" 

"Surely," replied Mrs. Gerald, as matter- 
of-factly as tho it was nothing at all, "why 
not?" 

"Well " began Alice. 

"Yes, let's," interrupted Mary; "I've been 
wanting a new apron to wear to the church 
[10] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

supper next Friday. Could we make an 
apron?" 

"But we haven't any material,'* objected 
Alice. 

"Haven't we!" laughed mother; "you just 
see! Come out to the pantry and look." 

Much interested, the two girls followed 
their mother out to the pantry, watched her 
as she pulled out the drawer where she put 
worn-out articles of clothing till they could 
be given away, and saw her pull out two of 
their father's discarded shirts. Then she 
went back into the sewing room, pulled out 
the box of supplies and selected two cards 
of colored edging to match the shirts. 

"There!" she said, with a look of satisfac- 
tion, as she spread her supplies out on the 
table, "there's all you'll want except num- 
ber sixty white thread, and there's plenty 
of that in the machine drawer." 

"Where's the pattern?" asked Alice, who 
by this time was much interested. 

"In my head," laughed Mrs. Gerald, "and 
inside half an hour you will have cut one for 
yourself out of a newspaper. Remember 
[11] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

the note books you kept for cooking?" added 
Mrs. Gerald. The girls nodded (of course 
they remembered and they also remembered 
all the fun they had while making those very 
same note books!). "Suppose you start 
sewing note books, — you'll find two, and 
some pencils, in my desk drawer." 

The girls hurried off to the living room 
and Mrs. Gerald whisked out her tape line, 
a pencil and a pad and began measuring and 
planning. 

*'Now then," she said when they were back 
in the room again, "take down these direc- 
tions and be sure you get everything just 
right, for you know I'll not be here to show 
you or explain." 

And this is what the girls wrote down in 
their books : 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING AN 
APRON. 

Materials needed: 

One old soft shirt. 

One bolt machine-made edging (color to go with 
shirt). 

[18] 




Diagram for Apron Pattern and Apron, Lesson 1. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Number 60 white thread. 

One sheet paper for pattern (newspaper will do). 

Tape line, ruler and pencil. 

Method to make pattern: 

(See Diagram.) 

Spread sheet of paper on table. 

From the lower right hand corner of the paper 
measure up the right side twenty inches. At that 
point make a letter A. 

With a ruler measure in five inches from A and 
make the letter B. 

Measure one inch above B and one half inch toward 
the outside edge and put a letter C. 

With the ruler draw a line from C to A. This line 
is the top of the pattern. 

Back at the lower right hand corner of paper put a 
letter D. 

Measure up ten inches from D and mark F. 

Measure in eight and one half inches from F and 
mark E. 

Draw a curved line from C thru E to D. 

Cut from A to C and down along the curved line 
toD. 

Be sure that the letters are inside the lines so that 
they are still on the pattern. 

To cut out apron: 

Spread shirt out on the table and cut out sleeves, 
being very sure to cut close to the seams so that no 
material is wasted. 

Cut off cuffs, and cut sleeves open. This leaves 

[14] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

two good sized pieces both bigger at the top than at 
the bottom. 

Lay top of one by bottom of the other and sew 
together. This has nothing to do with the apron but 
makes a nice dusting cloth and prevents waste of 
material. 

Cut off collar band. 

Cut large back and front pieces off the yoke, being 
careful to cut close to seams so that nothing is wasted. 
You now have three nice pieces, two fronts and one 
back. Spread them out smoothly on the table and 
the real cutting of the aprons begins. 

Fold the back piece in half down the center. 

Lay the pattern on this piece, fitting the line A 
to D along the lengthwise fold. The point D should 
be at the very bottom of the goods. 

Pin in place, using three or more pins. 

Cut out. 

Unpin pattern. 

Lay one front piece on the table. 

Fit the pattern on this piece, making the stripes (if 
there are any in the goods) lay straight with the line 
A to D. 

Cut out after the pattern has been pinned in place. 

Repeat, cutting another section from the other front 
piece. 

You now have three pieces; one, from the back 
which is twice the size of the pattern and one from 
each front piece. 

From the strips of goods remaining cut the belt, 
which is a strip twenty inches long and two and one 
half inches wide. 

[15] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

And cut two strings, each twenty-seven inches long 
and three inches wide. If shirt is badly worn, these 
strings may have to be pieced. 

Fold up pattern and put away. 

Gather up scraps, and thread machine with number 
60 white thread, ready to sew. 

To make apron: 

Hem strings making a tiny hem on the two sides 
and an inch hem on one end. Leave other end un- 
touched. 

Take larger apron piece and turn in one quarter 
inch on all but the top side. 

Stitch edging on these turned-in sides, fitting the 
turned-in edge neat and close to the embroidered edge 
of the trimming. Stitch in two rows 1/16 inch apart. 
This makes a neat and firm finish. 

Turn in one quarter inch on all but top side of both 
small pieces. 

Stitch edging in place down the side A to D and 
up the curved side to within six inches of the top. 

Lay the larger piece out on the table. 

Slip one smaller piece under the right curved edge 
of the larger and pin in place, so that they lap five 
inches at the widest point. Pin in place. 

Fit the other smaller piece in place on the left side, 
lapping five inches at the widest place, and pin in 
place. 

The apron is now in one piece and the sides A 
to D of the smaller sections are the outside edge. 

Stitch the lapped sections in place with double 

[16] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

stitching. Leave an opening of seven inches on the 
trimmed edge of the top piece, — this is to make a 
pocket. 

With six tiny little gathers (three on each side) set 
the apron into the belt. Leave the ends of the belt 
open. 

Turn in one half inch at each end of the belt. 

Fold the unhemmed end of one string into three 
little folds. 

Slip it into the turned-in belt and stitch in place 
with three rows of stitching. 

Repeat with the other string and the apron is fin- 
ished. 

**There!" said Mrs. Gerald, as the girls 
laid down their pencils, "that tells you 
everything to do. But let me warn you 
about one point, girk ; nc , er try to go faster 
than your directions. If you do each step 
correctly as it comes, you will understand 
the directions for the next step. But if you 
try to get ahead of yourself, you'll soon be 
hopelessly lost." 

"There is no hand work," suggested Alice, 
who had been looking over what she had 
written. 

"No, that's true," agreed Mrs. Gerald, 
"unless you call basting hand work. Of 
[17] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

course you will baste your edging in place 
before you stitch it and you will baste on 
the belt. I let you do it all by machine be- 
cause you both know how to run the ma- 
chine, and I believe that girls should learn 
the quickest methods of work right from 
the beginning. But if you were younger 
and had not yet learned to use the ma- 
chine, you could make nice aprons just the 
same, as it is all very simple hand work." 

"Who but you would have thought of 
using up old shirts this way," laughed Mary, 
as she picked up the shirt she had chosen. 

"We can not only make this kind of 
apron," said Mrs. Gerald, "but several 
other styles as well. I could use the bit of 
goods that will be left from the back to make 
a bib if I wanted. Or I could cut the back 
an inch larger all around and instead of mak- 
ing the extra pieces as you will do, I could 
cut a ruffle out of the fronts and sleeves and 
make a ruffled apron. Oh, there's many a 
bit can be made, as you'll see some day! 

"Now, see that the machine is threaded 
[18] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

and oiled," continued Mrs. Gerald, "and 
then I'll run along with my own work." 

The girls collected their supplies and then 
settled down to work. They helped each 
other on the pattern, as it was only neces- 
sary to have one. But each girl cut out her 
own apron all by herself, as that is half the 
fun. 

They had no trouble at all till they came 
to put the three pieces together; that seemed 
a puzzle till Alice noticed by the sketch her 
mother had left that the lap went only part 
of the way down and that the bottom was 
pointed like a letter W. After that it was 
all smooth sailing. By lunch time the strings 
were hemmed, all the edging stitched on and 
the three pieces were basted ready to sew 
together, and by two o'clock the whole thing 
was finished. 

And of all the aprons worn at the supper 
the next Friday evening, those worn by 
Alice and Mary were the most admired: — 
"shirt aprons" jumped into fashion in one 
night! 

[19] 




e:.t,:;ai.baiTI-, cnc3lb 



Alice cuts out her bag and Mary her handkerchief. 
Lesson 2. 




RUN THE RIBBON 
THROUGHTHE CASING 



LESSON 2. 



HANDKERCHIEF BAG AND 
HANDKERCHIEF. 



After the success with the aprons, Mary 
and Ahce were very enthusiastic about sew- 
ing and determined to do more. But school 
work and music kept them so busy that it 
was all of two weeks before they had time to 
take another stitch — everybody knows how 
such things happen sometimes. 

On the second Saturday morning after 
the supper at the church, Mrs. Gerald re- 
[21] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

marked as they were finishing breakfast, 
''There now! Monday is your Cousin Sue's 
birthday and we haven't planned a thing 
to give her!" 

"Mother!" exclaimed Alice in dismay, 
"how did we forget? You know Mary and 
I wanted to get something especially nice 
for her this year!" 

"I know you did," said Mrs. Gerald con- 
tritely, "but the days go by so swiftly " 

"Well," interrupted Mary eagerly, "what 
if they do? Here's one whole day we have 
and it's a Saturday, too. Let's make her 
something, — let's make something we can 
sew. She'd like that and it would encourage 
her to learn to sew, too," added Mary, with 
a wise little shake of her head. For Cousin 
Sue wasn't, as perhaps you have thought, a 
"big lady" cousin, — she was a little seven- 
year-old cousin of whom both the girls were 
particularly proud and to whom they were 
very devoted. 

"That's a good idea," said Mrs. Gerald 
thoughtfully, "and I have another good idea 
to put with it. You remember in Sue's last 
[22] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

letter she spoke of a party, and that her 
mother explained that instead of a birthday 
party of her own this year, Sue was going 
to a big party for some neighbor children 
that happened to be planned for the Sat- 
urday after Sue's own birthday — that will 
be next Saturday. Now of course her 
mother has her dress and slippers and all 
that planned, but suppose we give her some 
real grown-up extras. Suppose you girls 
make her a handkerchief bag and a dainty 
handkerchief to carry in it, and I'll give 
her a pretty new fan hung on a little chain 
which she can w^ear around her neck." 

"Goody!" exclaimed Alice happily, ''that's 
just the thing! And we'll use pink every- 
thing, because her party things are sure to 
be pink ; pink ribbons for the bag and a pink 
fan." 

It didn't take long to get the morning 
work out of the way that morning, for two 
girls who really want to help can do a lot. 
So it wasn't much after nine when the three 
of them met in the sewing room, the dishes 
[23] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

washed, the house set in order and everyone 
ready for work. 

"May we write down directions and keep 
note books and all that, mother?" asked 
Ahce. 

"Yes," replied Mrs. Gerald thoughtfully, 
"I think that is the best plan. Of course, 
I'm going to be here but I think you do bet- 
ter work when you depend on yourselves. 
So as soon as we hunt out materials, you may 
get your books and take down the direc- 
tions. I am sure I have materials in the 
house, as I always aim to keep something 
on hand for just such a time as this." 

And sure enough, in the piece bag, the 
ribbon box and the lace drawer were found 
just the right materials for the work. Next 
the note books were produced and these 
directions were written down: 



[24] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING A 

HANDKERCHIEF BAG AND 

HANDKERCHIEF. 

Materials needed: 

Piece of linen lawn (or similar material) 14 inches 
by 7 inches. 

Piece of handkerchief linen or fine dimity 12 inches 
by 12 inches. 

30 inches of Valenciennes lace insertion (narrow). 

1 and ^ yards Valenciennes edging to match. 

1 skein fine embroidery thread any color desired. 

1 spool number 80 white cotton. 

1 and 1/2 yards of ribbon i/> inch wide (color same 
as embroidery thread). 

Also bodkin, thimble, scissors and needles. 

Method for cutting: 

(See Diagram.) 
a. Bag. 

Cut the 1 4 by 7 piece into two squares each exactly 
seven inches. 

Lay one on top of the other and fold in half 
along the long way of the goods. 

Hold the folded edge to the left and round off the 
lower right hand corner. 

Unfold, and the pieces will be rounded off at both 
lower corners. 

Baste the two pieces together. 

[25] 



•7 IH. 



7 IH. 




Diagram for Handkerchief Bag Patterns. Lesson 2. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 
6. Handkerchief. 

Pull a thread along one side of the linen and cut 
by the mark thus made. 

Measure twelve inches from this edge and pull 
another thread. 

Along this mark cut the second side. 

Repeat till the whole square is cut. 

It is very important that the threads be pulled 
before the cutting is done. A handkerchief cut by 
thread will not only make up better but will always 
iron better than one cut carelessly. 

Method for making: 
a. Bag. 

With fine even stitches sew the bag together along 
three sides; that is, leaving the side opposite the 
curved end open. Keep the stitches Vs inch from 
the edge (Vg inch = —). 

Turn the bag thus formed other side out and crease 
firmly and neatly along the sewed edge. 

Sew a new seam just wide enough to take in the 
other seam — just a trifle wider than Vs inch. This 
double seam is called a French seam and is a common 
method of sewing because of the neatness and 
strength of the finished work. 

Make a narrow hem around the top — turning the 
hem on the outside, which, you see, is the wrong 
side of the bag. 

Turn the bag right side out and crease the seam 

neatly. 

[27] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Cut off 27 inches of the lace edging. 

Pin the middle of the edging to the middle of the 
bottom of the bag. 

Pin the ends of the edging to the top of the bag — 
one end to each side where the seam ends. 

With fine even stitches sew the lace onto the bag 
right along the outside of the seam. Hold the lace 
next to you and gather the lace just enough to use 
the whole 27 inches. 

Cut the insertion into two equal parts. 

Sew one part around the top from the outside. 

Sew the other part around the top from the inside. 

Sew the two pieces together at the top. This has 
made a lace casing for the ribbon strings. 

On the outside piece of insertion, just above the 
seam in the goods, snip a quarter inch opening. 
Whip around the edge so the insertion will not ravel. 
This is to make an opening for the ribbon strings. 
Of course the ends of the insertion make a natural 
opening at the other side. 

Sew the lace around the top, gathering it just 
enough to use the whole amount (18 inches). 

Cut the ribbon in half. 

With a bodkin run the ribbon thru the casing till 
it comes out the hole thru which it was put. (That 
is, run it clear around the top of the bag.) 

Tie the ends together in a neat bow. 

Repeat with the other piece of ribbon using the 
other opening. 

Hold ribbons at the bow, pull slightly to see that 
they "draw" properly, — and the bag is finished. 

[28] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

b. Handkerchief. 

Make a tiny turn three threads wide all around the 
linen square. 

Make a second turn four threads wide. 

Be sure that the corners lay neatly. 

Make a tiny knot in a length of colored embroidery 
thread, slip under the fold near a corner. 

Whip around the whole handkerchief making the 
stitches 14 ^^^^ apart and taking in the whole turn-in. 
Hold the wrong side of the kandkerchief towards you 
and be sure that the turn-in lays neatly under the 
stitches. 

When once around, turn the handkerchief so that 
the right side is toward you and go around again. 
This will make the second set of stitches cross the 
first set exactly on the edge and will make a very neat 
and attractive finish. 

After the girls had read thru the di- 
rections carefully so as to be sure they 
were understood they divided up the work. 
Inasmuch as they wanted to be sure and 
get the gifts done in time, they decided that 
Alice would make the bag and Mary the 
handkerchief, — Mary thought at first that 
perhaps this would make Alice do the most 
work, but she soon found that a handker- 
chief, carefully cut and neatly made, takes 
about as long to make as a bag! But both 
[29] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

girls took down the entire directions, and 
that was a good plan, because some day 
Alice might want to make a handkerchief 
or Mary a bag. 

They found that they liked to do fine 
hand work and tho it went very slowly, the 
finished result was something to be proud of. 

When she found that the work was going 
well and that she was not really needed, Mrs. 
Gerald decided to go and buy the fan so 
that the gifts might be packed in one box. 

By the time she returned, the girls were 
about thru their work and they were ready 
for the fun of packing. Fortunately both 
Alice and Mary had scrubbed their hands 
well before they started their sewing, so the 
finished work only needed a pressing to 
make it ready to send. 

Each gift was wrapped in white paper and 
tied with pink ribbon and the box was sent 
on its journey. And if little seven-year- 
old Sue had as much fun unpacking it as the 
two bigger girls had making the gifts and 
packing them, she had a very pleasant birth- 
day. 

[30] 




.i.-'.2tj.--J-'- !r:=3lt)! 



Alice shook out her bag for her mother to admire. 
Lesson 3. 




PUT TURN ED OVER 
EDGETHROUGHRING 

LESSON 8. 
MAKING A KNITTING BAG. 



Two or three days after the birthday 
package was sent off to Cousin Sue, Alice 
received an invitation to a "knitting" party. 
"Come at three o'clock and bring your knit- 
ting," the invitation read, and the day was 
the following Saturday. 

Now, of course, Alice and Mary and Mrs. 
Gerald, too, for that matter, had learned to 
knit when all the world was knitting. JNIrs. 
Gerald had accomplished a great deal and 
the girls, even with all their school work 
[33] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

and their music, had several army sweaters 
and pairs of wristlets to their credit. But it 
just happened that this was the first invita- 
tion to a real knitting ''party." And a knit- 
ting party means a knitting bag to carry the 
work in, — everybody knows that ! 

"^ou may carry my best sewing bag," 
suggested ]\Irs. Gerald when Alice spoke 
to her about her need. "My knitting bag 
has seen too much service so I won't offer it, 
but you are welcome to the best one." 

"Thank you, mother," replied Alice 
doubtfully, "but you see it has strings, and 
— well, it's just a regular sewing bag and 
I can't help wishing I had a knitting bag." 

"What's the difference?" laughed Mrs. 
Gerald. 

"Oh, there's much difference, mother," 
said Alice seriously. "A sewing bag has 
strings and draws together, while a knitting 
bag is more open. Some of the girls were 
talking about it the other day. We think 
sewing bags have to be shut tight because 
the scissors and thimble and spools of thread 
might easily drop out. But knitting is big 
[S4] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

and sort of all together so the bag can be 
more open without any danger of loss." 

"That's a good answer," replied Mrs. 
Gerald, much pleased with Alice's thought- 
ful observ^ations, "a good enough answer to 
deserve a new bag. How would you like to 
make one yourself?" 

"Really, mother?" exclaimed AHce de- 
lightedly. "I'd love it; and may I make it 
any way I like?" 

"Provided only that it's not too expensive 
a way," answered Mrs. Gerald. 

"Then I want to make it like the one you 
made for Aunt Jane last Christmas," said 
Alice. "You know that was of cretonne and 
was on hoops. Only I'd like mine yellow 
instead of rose color, as hers was." 

"Just the thing," said Mrs. Gerald, "yel- 
low will look wxU with your brown coat and 
your green and brown silk. I'm going down 
to the stores this afternoon, and I'll buy your 
materials then. Now, if you can come home 
from school promptly tomorrow afternoon 
you ought to be able to make the bag before 
dinner." 

[85] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

**So quickly?" asked Alice in surprise. 

"Surely!" replied Mrs. Gerald, "one of 
the first things a good sewer must learn is 
always to do a job in the quickest time pos- 
sible for good work. Never learn to take 
more time than necessary. An hour and a 
half at the most is time enough for making 
that knitting bag and if you take longer than 
that, there's something wrong somewhere — 
either with your sewing or my teaching. 
Now run along to school, dear, and remem- 
ber to make your plans today for a free hour 
and a half tomorrow." 

The next afternoon when Alice, hands all 
neatly scrubbed and note book in hand, came 
into the sewing room she found her mate- 
rials laid out ready for her and her mother 
waiting to dictate the directions. 

"Maybe you think it's a waste of time to 
write out ever>i;hing when I'll likely be 
working right here beside you," said Mrs. 
Gerald, "but one never can tell, — the 'phone 
might call me or the door bell just as we 
were at an important place. If you have 
everything down vou can go right along 
^[36] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

without me. Then, too, Mary may want to 
make a bag one of these days, — I got some 
material for her but don't you tell her, that's 
a surprise, — and when she does, it will be 
easy for her to copy your directions. So 
better take it all down." 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING A 
KNITTING BAG. 

Materials needed: 

SO inches of cretonne 27 inches wide. 
1 pair 7 inch oval embroidery rings. 

Method : 

Cut two strips each 1 and 1/2 inches wide from one 
end of goods. 

Crease a single "turn-in" 1/4 inch wide on both sides 
of each strip. 

Wrap the rings with these strips (one strip to each 
ring), being sure that the raw edges are firmly turned 
in. If put on right, one strip will just cover one 
ring. If it does not come out right the first time, 
unwrap very carefully and wrap again so that the 
ring is entirely covered. 

Tack the end of each strip with a few firm stitches 
so that it does not come unwrapped. 

Fold the big piece of cretonne remaining in half, 

[37] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

right side in, the raw edges together and the selvage 
at the ends. 

Sew each end, beginning at the fold, to within six 
inches of the raw edge. Use thread that most nearly 
matches the cretonne and make neat firm stitches. 
Before cutting thread at the end, take three or four 
firm "back stitches" so the end is very strong. 

Turn over 14 ^^^^^ *^" both raw edges. 

Pick up one wrapped ring. Put turned over edge 
thru the ring and pin firmly as at A. 

Do the same at B. 

Baste in place all the way across between the 
pinned ends. If the goods seems cumbersome, let it 
slip a little above A and B while working between 
these points. The hem thus formed should be loose 
enough to allow the goods to work along the ring. 

Sew the hem firmly being careful to see that the 
hem is wide enough so that the stitches do not catch 
in the wrapping of the ring. 

Repeat, sewing the other end of the cretonne onto 
the other ring. 

Slip the goods into even gathers between A and B 
and the bag is finished. 

Much to Alice's delight she found the 
bag very easy to make. She was puzzled at 
only one time and that was when she started 
to put the goods onto the rings. But a lit- 
tle thought as to how the bag must lo^k when 
finished solved that difficulty and after that 
[38] 





Diagram showing ring for handle and finished Knitting 
Bag. Lesson 3. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

all was smooth sailing. To be sure there 
wasn't much visiting in that sewing room, — 
beginners can't talk and do good work, too, 
unless of course there's a lot of plain seam- 
ing or henmiing to be done; bag making 
takes head work. 

In just an hour and fifteen minutes from 
the time she picked up the work, Alice shook 
out the finished bag for her mother to see 
and approve. 

"Fine!" exclaimed Mrs. Gerald proudly, 
"and you've beat the time record I set for 
you. Now you can go to the party and knit 
all you like. And, moreover, it wouldn't 
surprise me to hear that Mary wanted a 
bag too, party or no party." 

And Mary, who happened into the sewing 
room just in time to see the pretty bag and 
hear her mother's words, added, "She cer- 
tainly does!" 



[40] 




■^^ 



French seams. Lesson 4. 




A ROLLED HE/v\ 
AT THE NECK 



LESSON 4, 



DOLL UNDERWEAR. 

The letters that arrived from Cousin Sue 
and from her mother were so loud in the 
praises of the handkerchief bag and the 
dainty 'kerchief and of the fine work on 
each, that Alice and Mary felt proud and 
happy and inspired to do more work. 

"I knew our box of gifts looked pretty," 

said Alice happily, "but I didn't realize how 

very pleased Sue would be when she found 

we had made her something all by ourselves. 

[43] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Why don't we make her something more, 
mother?" 

*'I guess there isn't any reason," laughed 
Mrs. Gerald, as she folded up the letters 
and laid them in her desk, "unless the fact 
that no Christmas or birthday is coming is 
a reason!" 

"Well, that's not a good reason at all," 
replied Alice, "surely we can find some ex- 
cuse for sewing, — Valentine's Day is passed 
and Washington's birthday and — and — Oh! 
I know! there's Easter left! We can give 
her something for Easter." 

"All right," laughed Mrs. Gerald, "if you 
have to have a day to celebrate, Easter will 
do as well as any. What is it you want to 
make for her?" 

Before Alice had had time to make an 
answer, Mary said, "Let's dress a doll for 
her — a nice big doll and make pretty, grown- 
up clothes and a hat and a wrap and every- 
thing." 

"Goody!" exclaimed Alice, and quick as 
a flash she began making plans. "Mother, 

you may get the doll for your share " 

[44] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

"Thank you kindly for the permission!" 
said Mrs. Gerald, and she made her daughter 
an elaborate bow. 

"And Mary and I," continued Alice, "will 
make all the clothes. There'll be enough to 
do for two, I know. And think how much 
sewing we'll learn while we're making the 
things," added Alice persuasively. 

"A bargain's a bargain," said Mrs. Ger- 
ald, "and I'll get the doll on one condition — 
you must promise to cut your own patterns 
for the clothes, by directions I'll give you, 
of course, and all the sewing on the clothes 
must be the neatest, best hand work vou can 
do." 

"Agreed!" said Alice and Mary together, 
and Mary added, "I wish we could begin this 
very afternoon. I always hate to wait after 
a nice plan is made." 

"You don't need to wait," said Mrs. Ger- 
ald, "for I happen to know that Mrs. Dar- 
roU bought a doll for her little Doris only 
last week. I am sure I can get another just 
that same size. Suppose you slip over and 
ask to borrow that doll for this afternoon's 
[45] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

work, and by tomorrow I can have the on^ 
you will give to Cousin Sue right here ready 
for you." 

The girls slipped into their sweaters and 
dashed across the street on their errand. 

Mrs. Darroll, like the good neighbor she 
always was, seemed perfectly willing to loan 
the new doll and was much interested in the 
plans for making clothes. 

"I was just wondering how in the world 
I was going to get that doll dressed for 
Doris in time for her birthday, because I 
have so little time when she is not around. 
And now you've given me an idea," she 
said. "If you can dress a doll for your Uttle 
cousin, why can't I hire you to dress one 
for me ? You wouldn't mind earning a little 
extra money, would you?" she added, with 
a twinkle of fun in her eye. 

"Would we?" exclaimed Alice. 

"But I think we ought to wait till we show 
you how we can dress the first doll," said 
careful Mary, "and then, if you like our 
work, we can do something for you." 

"That's good business," said Mrs. Darroll 
[46] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

approvingly. "I have an idea you can just 
suit me. So tell your mother to hurry on 
with her lessons." 

"The very first thing to do," said Mrs. 
Gerald when the girls settled down for work 
a few minutes later, "is to get your measure- 
ments. This is what is called an 'eighteen 
inch' doll, you see, because it is eighteen 
inches from the top of the head to the feet. 
We are going to make this doll a 'lady doll,' 
so the clothes must come just above the shoe 
tops. That means that the bottom of the 
skirt must be about half way between the 
knee and the ankle, and the pantie legs must 
be just a trifle shorter than that. If you will 
watch me, I will measure the doll to show 
you how it is done. But don't take my 
measurements, take down where I measure. 
Then when I have finished you may each 
take the measure and, one after the other, 
make your own measurements and write 
them down in your own books. But before 
we begin the measuring, let's set down the 
materials needed, — you see I have them all 
hunted up ready for you." 
[47] 



im^,>«>f.B.^ff.!^ 




SKIRT 



PANTIES -CENTER 

Diagram of Patterns for Doll Underwear. Lesson 4. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING DOLL 
UNDERWEAR. 

Materials needed: 

2/3 yard of white cotton material (long cloth, lawn 
or similar material). 

1 and Yo yard of narrow lace edging. 

Number 00 white cotton thread, needles, scissors, 
tape line, etc., 

Measurements for pattern: 

Waist measure — 1 1 inches. 

Leg length — 7 inches. ' 

Neck — 3 and y^y inches. 

Around leg at knee (loose) — 8 and % indues. 
Around arm at shoulder (loose) — 3 and 1'. indies. 
Shoulder — 1 and Vo inches. 

Length from shoulder to half way between knee 
and ankle — 12 inches. 

Cutting pattern : 

(See Diagram.) 
a. Skirt. 

Take a piece of smooth, clean paper 12 inches by 
and 1/2 inches. 

Mark the center of one of the narrow sides. This 
mark is the middle of the top. 

Mark one inch to each side of this center mark. 

[49] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Cut a slight curve between these points. This is 
the neck. 

2 inches from each side of the neck make a mark. 
This is the end of the shoulder. (You will notice 
that this shoulder is 2 inches while the doll's shoulder 
measured only 1 and % inches. The extra lA inch 
is for hems.) 

From the end of each shoulder (three inches from 
the center) draw a line to the lower corner. Cut 
along this line, and you will have a pattern like the 
little sketch. Put a cross at each shoulder to remind 
you that the shoulder lays on a crosswise fold when 
the material is cut. 

h. Panties. 

(See Diagram.) 

Take a piece of smooth paper 9 inches by 7 inches. 

Mark the center of one 9 inch side. This is the 
middle of the bottom. 

Mark 2 and Y^ inches above this center mark. 
Call this A. 

Mark % inch to each side of the lower center mark. 
These are B and C. 

Draw a U shaped line from B thru A to C. Cut 
along this line. 

On the opposite 9 inch side mark 1 inch from each 
edge. 

Draw a line from this new mark to the lower out- 
side corner on each side. Cut along this line. This 
takes out some of the fulness that would be too cum- 
bersome around the waist of the finished garipent. 

[SO] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 
Directions for cutting material: 

a. Skirt. 

Fold the goods in half crosswise so that the raw 
edges are together. 

Lay the pattern near the selvage and with the 
shoulder edge (where the crosses were put) exactly 
on the crosswise fold. 

Pin firmly and then cut out. 

b. Panties. 

With the goods still doubled fit the pattern near 
the selvage corner and with the lower edges exactly 
on the crosswise edges. 

Pin firmly in place and cut. Notice that two parts 
are thus cut at once. 

Directions for making: 

a. Skirt. 

Starting two inches below the top of shoulder, sew 
the sides in a neat, very narrow French seam. 

Make a 1/2 i^^ch hem around the bottom. 

Cut a 5 inch opening down the center back and hem. 

Make a tiny rolled hem around the neck. 

Hem the arm holes, making an 1/8 ^"ch hem. 

Sew lace around the bottom, gathering it just 
enough to use 24- inches. 

b. Panties. 

Sew the U shaped curve with a tiny French seam. 
Sew one side with a French seam. 

[51] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Sew the other side to three inches from the top. 

Hem the two legs. 

Divide the lace remaining and sew one piece onto 
each leg making it full enough to use the whole 
amount. 

Of the goods unused, cut a straight strip 12 and V2 
inches long and 1 and l/o inches wide. This is the 
belt. 

Gather the panties just enough to make them fit 
into the twelve inches of the belt. (The extra half 
inch makes a y^ inch turn at each end.) 

Sew the panties onto the belt, — the belt on the 
wrong side. 

Turn the belt over and hem down on the right side. 

Sew snappers on the belt of the panties. 

Sew snappers on the skirt at the neck. 



Mary decided that instead of each girl 
helping on each garment it would be more 
fun and also much quicker if each girl made 
one whole garment. So she asked to make 
the panties and suggested that Alice do the 
skirt. Alice was pleased with the suggestion, 
and they set to work at once. 

It took a good deal of thinking to get the 

pattern just right, and Mrs. Gerald had to 

remind them that the old adage *'the more 

haste the less speed" applied to sewing as 

[52] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

well as to other things, and that they must 
do only one step at a time. That they 
mustn't even try to read the second step till 
the first was done, and the third till the sec- 
ond was finished. Her advice proved good, 
and by going slowly they did their work 
accurately and there was nothing to undo. 

When the garments were finished they put 
them on the doll and were more than pleased 
with the way they fitted and looked, 

"If the dress and coat turn out as well as 
these have," said Alice proudly, "Mrs. Dar- 
roll will think we're regular dressmakers." 



[58] 



Oux'ir 



iciib 



c— : 



r 



1 n 



t 



tn#^ 




Sew the waist and skirt together. Lesson 5. 




BIND THE NECK 
WITH I^ROWN RIBBON 



LESSON 5, 



MAKING A DOLL DRESS. 



"I'm sure Mary wouldn't care," said 
Alice ; "she'd want either of us to work when- 
ever there was time, and you know we had 
agreed that each of us would do a garment 
alone just as we did the underwear." 

Alice had come home from school unex- 
pectedly early, a couple of days after the 
doll underwear was made, and she was anx- 
ious to improve her time by getting some 
more work done on those doll clothes. Not 
[55] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

only that the doll for Sue might be dressed 
by Easter time, but also that she might show 
Mrs. Darroil her skill at sewing and get the 
order for more work. 

"I think you are right," agreed Mrs. Ger- 
ald, as she folded up her own work and pre- 
pared to give her attention to Alice. "You 
can take the directions for the dress and she 
can copy them. Then tomorrow when she 
comes home early and you are late, — I be- 
lieve your music lesson comes tomorrow, — 
she can make the wrap, and you'll be 
thru. Now what kind of a dress do you 
want the doll to have, dear?" 

Alice thought a minute. "Of course I'd 
like silk if you have any, mother, because 
silk will look so like a big lady dressed up 
for Easter." 

"Then silk it shall be," replied Mrs. Ger- 
ald. "I think there are plenty of pieces left 
from your green and brown silk. To buy 
new silk would be pretty expensive, as we 
would have to get a third of a yard, but I 
think we are smart enough to manage with 
the scraps. I think you had better make it 
[56] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

a waist and skirt dress, — only of course you 
will sew them together so it will really be 
a one piece dress, — and for that you need 
only make a pattern for the waist. If your 
note book is ready you may take this down. 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING A 
DOLL DRESS. 

Making the pattern for the waist: 
(See Diagram.) 

Take a piece of smooth paper 13 and % inches by 
5 inches. The 5 inch length is the up and down of 
the waist. 

Mark the center of the top A. 

Mark 1 inch to each side of A and cut out a curve 
between the two marks. This makes the hollow for 
the neck. 

Down one side make a mark 3 and ^^ inches from 
the top. Mark this D. 

Straight in from D measure 3 inches and mark B. 

2 and ^2 inches from the lower corner mark C. 

Draw a line from D to B and then to C. Cut 
along this line. 

Fold the pattern in half and draw the shape of 
the line DBC on the other side. Cut along this line 
and unfold the paper. 

Cutting the dress: 
Cut a piece 9 inches by 24 inches. The stripes run 
the 9 inch way of the goods. This is for the skirt. 

[57] 



7 



la'A IN. 
A 






2 2 



i3 UJj^ , 

VV-3iN-->' ; 



V/AIST OF DRESS 



.24 IN. 



OD 



BUCKLE 



BELT 



2 IN 




PCXC^ET 



CUT FROn AN OLD LEATHER GLOVE 
Diagram of Patterns for Doll Dress. Lesson 5. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Lay the waist pattern with shoulder on a crosswise 
fold of the goods. Be sure that the stripes lay ex- 
actly even. 

Pin the pattern firmly in place. 

Cut out, being very careful to cut slowly and 
evenly. 

Making the dress: 

Sew the skirt together in a French seam, leaving 
a 2 inch opening which should be hemmed for the 
placket. 

Make a 1 inch hem around the bottom of the skirt. 
Gather the top with small, even stitches. 

Cut open the back of the waist clear to the bot- 
tom. 

Make a small hem (1/4 inch) on each side. 

Sew up the underarm seams. 

Bind the neck and sleeves with brown ribbon % 
inch wide. This makes a neat finish that is also a 
trimming, for it looks like cording. 

Gather the bottom of the waist till it measures 12 
inches. 

Sew the waist and skirt together with the seam 
on the wrong side. 

With brown seam binding or a bit of ribbon cover 
the raw edge thus made. This not only makes a 
neat looking dress, both right and wrong sides, but 
makes it much stronger. 

Cut a bias sash 2 and I/2 inches wide and 24 inches 
long. This can be pieced if necessary. Make a tiny 
hem on both sides. 

Tack the middle of the sash to the middle of the 

[59] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

front at the waist. Draw gently around to the back ; 
tack with firm, neat stitches one inch from the back. 
If there is not enough goods to make such a sash, a 
leather belt — cut from a worn kid glove — would be 
very nice. In this case leather pockets 2 inches by 
2 inches might be added to the dress just below the 
belt. 

Put three black snappers on the back of the 
waist and one at the belt. 

Alice felt very important when she started 
making a real dress — especially a silk one! 
She cut out the goods very carefully and 
made no mistake, which was lucky, as there 
was just barely enough material for what 
she would need. 

Mrs. Gerald had her notice particualrly 
the shape and proportion of the waist pat- 
tern. 

"Vou find, Alice," she said, "that a pat- 
tern of that shape is the pattern you will 
use most of all because it's by far the best 
shape for a beginner to manage. If you 
get along with this dress as well as yon have 
with your other sewing, I'll be tempted to 
let you make something for yourself. And 
in that case you'll be sure to make a pat- 
[60] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

tern for yourself of just this very peasant- 
sleeve style." 

In making the waist Alice was particular 
to put a few extra stitches just at the under- 
arm turn, for there was where most of the 
"pull" would come when the dress was put 
on the doll or taken off. And when she put 
the brown ribbon on the sleeves and neck 
she was careful to turn in the edges exactly 
so that no frayed ends spoiled the neatness 
of her work. 

A careful matching up of odd pieces 
showed that a silk belt would be a pretty 
much pieced affair. Alice didn't mind that 
a bit, as she was really hoping for the leather 
belt her mother had spoken of. Fortunately 
Mrs. Gerald had an old pair of brown gloves 
just the right shade, and from the wrists of 
those the belt and pockets were cut. Of 
course with the leather there were no tied 
ends as there would have been with the sash. 
Instead, Alice cut a piece of pasteboard one 
inch square; from the inside of this square 
she cut a square of Yi inch. This made the 
shape of a buckle. Alice then pasted leather 
[61] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

over the pasteboard and turned in neat edges 
making a very good leather buckle which 
she sewed over the lap of the leather belt at 
the back. The leather pockets she cut with 
a slight point at the bottom and she bound 
the tops with ribbon to match the sleeves. 

Then, when the dress was finally finished, 
came the exciting job of "trying on." 

But so carefully had her measurements 
been taken, and so accurately had the sew- 
ing all been done, that the dress slipped over 
the doll's head and snapped into place as 
tho it were an old friend. 

"There!" exclaimed Alice proudly, as she 
smoothed the gathers into place just to her 
liking, "who says I'm not a dressmaker 
now?" 

"Not I!" answered Mrs. Gerald, admir- 
ing the work, "I'm expecting to see your 
sign out most any day!" 



[62] 




:Q.bne.Tl-, C::ic=lt3oT-r-,t 

All the clothes were made just right. Lesson 6. 




SEW UP DART 

IN the: cape 



LESSON 6. 

MAKING A DOLL'S CAPE AND 
HAT. 

When Mary returned and saw the hand- 
some doll dress Alice had made, she "Oh-ed" 
and "Ah-ed" and exclaimed quite enough to 
suit even the proudest sister, and declared 
that that particular brown and green silk 
dress was the very prettiest she had ever 
seen. And then she added, "But I wanted 
to make something pretty, too! Underwear 
is all very well— I suppose the dress wouldu t 
[65] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

look very nice without it, — but I did want 
to make something pretty for that doll." 

"And you shall," said Mrs. Gerald 
promptly, "Alice and I talked about that 
very thing. You needn't think we're going 
to let a nice doll like that go all the way to 
Cousin Sue's town without any wraps! 
We're counting on your making a hat and a 
coat of some sort." 

"Goody!" exclaimed Mary happily. "To- 
morrow I can come home early and get to 
work. And j^ou and I can work together, 
mother, like you and Alice did today, be- 
cause she has to take her music lesson." 

Mary put away her wraps promptly the 
next afternoon, made herself clean and tidy 
after the day's work at school, hunted up 
her note book and pencil and returned to the 
sewing room to find her mother puzzling 
over a pile of pieces. 

"If I'm not mistaken, Mary," said Mrs. 
Gerald smilingly, "this lady's coat is going 
to be a cape. The sleeves of a real coat are 
very complicated for a beginner, and any- 
way I think a cape would be much easier for 
[66] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

little Sue to manage. And then I have just 
the right material for a cape." And she 
spread out some gray material for Mary to 
see. 

"Why, mother!" exclaimed Mary, 
"that's " 

"Yes, of course," replied Mrs. Gerald, 
"that's from father's bath robe. And better 
goods for a doll's cape would be hard to 
find. This gray and black design is pretty; 
the material is warm and soft, too, and you 
will find it very pleasant to work with. 
We'll make the hat green, which will go 
nicely with the dress and will contrast well 
with the cape." 

She pulled out her supply of yarn scraps, 
selected a small ball of green and then said, 
"IVow for directions. It's pretty hard to 
tell you the amount of material you will use 
when we're only taking scraps. If you were 
buying new, I would suggest that you take 
your pattern to the store and try it on va- 
rious remnants till the most economical was 
found. We're lucky to have a piece bag to 
save us that bother." 

[67] 




CAPE 



L61N. 



SHAPE 
ON WHICH 
TO WEAVE 
THE HAT 




Diagram of Patterns for Doll Hat and Cape. Lesson 6. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING A 
DOLL'S CAPE AND HAT, 

Making the pattern for the cape : 

(See Diagram.) 

Take a smooth piece of paper 16 inches square. 

From the lower right hand corner measure up 5 
inches and mark that point B. 

Make a letter A in the lower left hand corner. 

Draw a slightly curved line (downward curve) 
from B to A. 

Cut along this line. This is the bottom of the cape. 

On the left hand side of the paper measure up from 
A 14 inches and mark that point E. That point E 
is the back of the neck of the cape. 

Put the left hand end of your ruler at E and swing 
the ruler slightly upward till eight inches comes just 
to the edge of the paper. Mark that point C. 

Draw a line from C, which is the front of the neck, 
to B. 

Cut along this line which is the front of the cape. 

The line EA is the same height as the line CB. 
See diagrams. 

Half way between points E and C make the mark 
D. 

Make little marks 1 and 1/4 inches either side of D. 
Measure 2 and ^A inches straight toward the bottom 
of the cape from D and mark that point F. 

Draw a V with the point F as the point of the 
letter and the two points on either side of D as the 
ends. 

[69] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Cut out the V. This makes the dart that fits to 
the shoulder. 

Cutting the cape: 

Fold the goods in half, lengthwise, and lay the 
pattern with the line from A to E on the lengthwise 
fold. 

Pin carefully in place. 

Cut out, using particular care to have the edges 
even and free from any jagged cuts. 

Making the cape: 

Sew up the dart and overcast or bind the seam 
open. 

Turn in 1/3 inch on all raw edges. 

Face the edges with seam binding that nearest 
matches the color of the goods and hem the binding 
in place. This is done because the goods is too heavy 
and cumbersome to hem in the usual fashion. 

Put two sets of snappers near the neck in the front 
or, if preferred, make little "frogs" of black braid 
and button with black buttons. 

Making the hat: 

(See Diagram.) 

Take a piece of very stiff artist's cardboard 8 
inches square. 

Trim off corners till it is a perfect circle. 

Cut 31 notches around the circumference, making 
each % inch deep and equally spaced. 

Hold the end of the yarn in the center of the 

[70] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

cardboard. This is done by holding the fingers under 
the board and catching the yarn under the thumb 
which is placed just in the middle of the top. 

Run the yarn out over one point which we can 

^^Run the yarn back, across the center to a point 
directly opposite point 1 which we can call 16 

Then run the yarn back across the center and catch 

it over point 2. . ^ ,« 

Then back thru the center and over pomt 17. 

And so on, back and forth, till every point has a 
loop of yarn around it. , , r . ^i. 

When all points have been thus looped, fasten the 
yarn by taking three buttonhole stitches at the center; 
thus catching all overlapping yarns together. 

Thread a bodkin with a long piece of yarn and, 
beginning at the center, weave in and out, round and 
round and round. If that length of yarn is used up, 
take another and starting back a few threads, contmue 
the weaving till no more yarn will go on the crossed 

warp. , , 1 ix 

With the thumb and forefinger slip the loops oil 
from the points of the cardboard, one point after 
another till the hat is free from the board. 

With both thumbs held towards the center and the 
fingers at the center on the under side, shape the hat 
till its crown is just right for tlie doll's head. The 
hat will be found very pliable and very easily shaped 
in any desired way. i ^. j 

As a finish a band of ribbon or a cord may be tied 
around the base of the crown and a tiny feather thrust 
thru. 

[71] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Two colors of yarn may be used if desired making 
a striped effect that gives a nice variety. 



Mary thought that cutting the pattern 
was going to be an awful job — the long 
directions and the lettering and all sounded 
very complicated to her. But much to her 
surprise she found that by following her 
mother's advice and doing just one thing at 
a time, the whole pattern was cut out before 
she knew it. And of course after the pat- 
tern was made, cutting out the cape and 
making it were just plain fun, — that's all. 

She had never put on binding before and 
she found she liked working with the soft, 
silky, ribbon-like band and that it made her 
work look very neat and tailored. 

Instead of making "frogs" of black braid 
as Mrs. Gerald had first suggested, Mary 
decided to make them of green braid and 
button them onto jet buttons. Then, in her 
millinery piece bag, JNIrs. Gerald found a 
small jet buckle which JSIary sewed onto the 
little hat, thus giving it a very smart, tailored 
air. 

[72] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

By the time the coat and hat were finished 
Alice had come home from her lesson, and 
the girls had the fmi of dressing the doll, of 
finding that all the clothes were made just 
right and, finally, of taking her over to 
show Mrs. Darroll their work. She was so 
pleased with the clothes the girls had made 
that she immediately engaged an outfit for 
Doris's birthday doll. 

Then, after Mr. Gerald, too, had been 
shown the work his girls had done, the doll 
was packed up and started on its journey to 
Cousin Sue. 



[73] 



i f 



n - 



^"-; 






^1 






: 1 









Everything in pink and white to match. Lesson 7. 




TIE ENDS IN 
DOUBLE KNOT 



LESSON 7. 

MAKING DOLL BEDDING. 

After an earnest conference together 
Alice and Mary decided that it was best 
for Alice to have charge of Mrs. Darroll's 
order for doll clothes and to do most of the 
work herself. Doris's birthday was only 
a few days away, and Alice, by a lucky hap- 
penstance, had more time than usual for a 
week because of the absence of one of her 
teachers, so she could surely devote some 
time every day to the work. 
[75] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

But on Friday Mary came home at ten 
oY'lock and announced that school was closed 
for the day on account of a teachers' meet- 
ing, and that she was ready to help. 

"What is there to do?" asked Alice in 
dismay. "I know you hate filling in at just 
any sort of work and I have all the interest- 
ing part, the cutting and all that, done!" 

Before Mary had time to answer, the tele- 
phone rang and Mrs. Darroll's voice asked 
to speak to Mary. 

"I thought I saw you go into the house 
just a minute ago," she began by way of 
preface, "and I was wondering if you're 
having a vacation, and if so, whether you'd 
be willing to help me with something else." 

"Surely," replied Mary, and immediatelj^ 
she began having a nice important feeling. 

"Mr. Darroll has been so interested in this 
doll outfit," continued IMrs. Darroll, "and he 
has wanted to do something for Doris's 
birthday that would fit in wath the doll 
things. You know he is pretty good at car- 
pentering, but you don't know — you could 
never guess — what a fine little doll bed he 
[76] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

has made for her! And he insists that yon 
are to make the bedding outfit for it. Do 
you think you can, Mary?" 

Now, as of course it's easy to guess, Mary 
and Mr. Darroll were good friends, and 
when Mrs. Gerald was appealed to she had 
no trouble understanding that Mr. Darroll 
had made that bed quite as much for her 
own Mary as for his little girl. But, how- 
ever that might be, the bed was made and 
Mary should do her part. So she nodded 
her head to Mary's question and the little 
girl hurried back to the 'phone. 

"Splendid!" exclaimed Mrs. Darrol, much 
pleased. "Then you bring your tape line 
and note book over here and get the meas- 
ures, and I'm sure your mother can tell you 
just what to get for the covers and how to 
make them." 

Mary lost no time getting her sewing note 
book and hurrying across the street, you 
may be sure. She found that the bed Mr. 
Darroll had made was 24 inches long and 12 
inches wide, — just right for a doll the size 
Doris was to have. So she wrote down these 
[77] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

figures in her book, admired the fine work 
Mr. DarroU had done in making the bed, 
and then skipped off home to begin her own 
part. 

"I think this job is going to be a fine one 
for you," said Mrs. Gerald approvingly, as 
she sat down to give Mary the necessary 
directions, "because you'll learn so many 
things about the making of bedding, — things 
that are just as true about grown folks' bed- 
ding as about dolls' bedding. For instance, 
you'll notice when I give you the figures that 
I add exactly half the width of the bed to 
make side turn-ins on the sheet. That is, 
when the bed is twelve inches wide I add six 
inches to the twelve inches and make the 
finished sheet eighteen inches wide. Of 
course all ready made sheets do not have 
as wide a turn-in as that perhaps, but all 
good homemade ones do and the better of 
the ready made ones are of that proportion. 
Then you will notice that the same amount, 
six inches, plus three inches for hems, is 
added to the length so that the sheet can be 
turned in comfortably all around." 
[78] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING DOLL 
BEDDING. 

Sheets : 

Take 3S inches of musliii 36 inches wide. 

Cut or tear into two parts, lengthwise. This leaves 
two pieces each 18 inches by 33 inches. 

Make a 14 i^^h hem on each eighteen inch side. 

Turn in 1/4 i^^^ at top and bottom of each sheet. 

Turn a 1 inch hem at one end and hem neatly. 

Turn a 2 inch hem at the other end and hem neatly. 
The two inch hem is at the top of the sheet. 

Make the other sheet exactly the same way. 

Pillows and slips: 

(See Diagram.) 

Take two pieces of heavy muslin each 8 and Yz 
inches by 5 and % inches. 

Double one piece together and sew it almost shut. 

Turn other side out. 

Fill with tiny clippings of paper instead of feathers 
and sew shut with small firm stitches. 

Repeat to make the second pillow. 

Take two pieces of muslin each 9 inches by 9 inches. 

Fold one piece in half and sew together along one 
long and one short side. 

Hem the remaining side making a 1 and % inch 
hem. 

Sew narrow lace on at the edge of the hem and 
turn right side out. 

[79] 





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?-7 IN 



BLIND SB"^A/ 



Diagram of Patterns for Doll Bedding. Lesson 7. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Repeat with other piece to make the second pillow 
slip. 

Blanket. 

Piece of white or colored wool 27 inches by 18 
inches. (If real wool cannot be used, outing flannel 
makes a nice substitute.) 

Buttonhole all around with a dainty color. 

Comfort. 

(See Diagram.) 

Piece of silkaline (or other soft cotton goods) 36 
inches by 27 inches. 

Two pieces of cotton batting each 27 inches by 18 
inches. 

Lay the cotton batting on half the silkaline. 

Fold the other half over and lay neatly in place. 

Turn in a ^ inch hem all around. 

Baste the top and bottom together. 

Blind stitch all around. This means sew with small 
stitches that show just as little as possible. If de- 
sired, featherstitching in a dainty color makes an 
even better finish. 

Beginning to measure from the lower left hand 
corner, put a pin every three inches over the surface 
of the comfort. 

Take double, mercerized thread in a big needle and 
stitch down and up where the first pin is placed. 

Cut the ends leaving them long enough to tie. 

Tie ends in a double knot and trim off if too long. 

Repeat at each pin. This is called "knotting a 
comfort," and is done to keep the cotton on the 
inside from slipping. 

[81] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Spread. 

Heavy piece of cotton goods^ mercerized or figured 
if possible^ 20 inches by 27 inches. 

Make a very small rolled hem on all sides. 

On to this hem sew coarse, narrow lace, holding it 
full while rounding the corners so that it lies evenly 
and is flat. 

Press in place with warm iron. 

S and 1/3 yards of narrow torchon lace will make 
both the pillow slips and the spread. 

"You will notice," continued Mrs. Gerald 
as Mary closed her book, "that the spread is 
finished all around so that it can hang down 
over the other, tucked-in covers. 

"Suppose," asked Mary, who always liked 
to be sure she understood, "suppose the bed 
I want to outfit was some other size, — what 
then?" 

"That's easy," laughed Mrs. Gerald, "just 
compare your bed with the size of this one 
and keep the proportions the same. If you 
want to fit out a smaller bed, make smaller 
sizes for the bedding — if your bed is two 
inches narrower, make the sheets and every- 
thing just that much narrower." 

Mary took the list of sizes over to Mrs. 
[82] 



hEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Darroll and was given material for the 
whole outfit, — everything in pink and white 
to match Doris's room and just exactly the 
sort of materials a little girl like Mary would 
love working on. 

Such a busy lot of folks as there were 
around the Gerald House that day! And 
when, just before five, both girls put up their 
work to go for a play out of doors, all the 
bedding and the doll clothes were finished 
ready for the final pressing that was to make 
them absolutely perfect. 



[83] 



r 







&.2EiBstH cr.olfcJCJVi' 



Pin pockets in place. Lesson 8. 




SEW HOOKS AND EYES 
AT BACK OF BELT 



LESSON 8. 



MAKING A SKIRT TO WEAR 
WITH MIDDIES. 

One evening two or three weeks after 
the doll outfits were finished and sent away, 
Alice and Mary were talking over the work 
they had done. 

*'I liked sewing on the doll things," said 
Mary thoughtfully, ^'because little clothes 
such as doll things can be finished up so 
easily." 

"That's one of my reasons for liking doll 
[85] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

things, too," agreed Alice. "I hate having 
sewing around and around and around. 
There's Ruth Dixon, — her mother's teach- 
ing her to sew, and all in the world she does 
is hem napkins and make towels." 

"Yes," laughed Mrs. Gerald, who loved 
to poke fun at her daughters, "and I'll wager 
that she can hem much better than you can, 
as a result, my dear." 

"Maybe so," rephed Alice gaily, "but I 
know she hates sewing. And I love it be- 
cause I learn to make things. I told Ruth 
the other day about our doll outfits and she 
looked as tho she'd like to be doing the same 
things we did. And moreover, she said that 
before we knew it we'd be making dresses 
for ourselves!" 

"To be sure," replied Mrs. Gerald, in a 
matter-of-fact voice, "why not?" 

"But mother," began Alice in surprise, 
"dresses are hard to do!" 

"How do you know they are?" said Mrs. 
Gerald, "you've never made one." 

"Caught !" shouted Mary gaily. And then 
she added seriouslv, "But really, mother, 
[86] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

could we make some clothes for ourselves? 
I was wishing the other day that I had some 
new things, — odds and ends you might call 
them. You have so much to do all the time 
and things cost so much to buy ready made. 
It would be great fun to make some spring 
things for ourselves." 

"No reason in the world why you 
shouldn't," said her mother; "I'm much 
pleased to know that you have enough am- 
bition to make you want to help yourself. 
What had you thought of that you would 
like to make?" 

"Well," answered Mary thoughtfully, 
"there's a skirt to wear with middies, — you 
know some days it's awfully warm for my 
serge skirt now and yet I don't like to begin 
wearing my light dresses yet. Then I really 
need a new kimono and " 

"Don't bother to think up more," ex- 
claimed Mrs. Gerald, "two articles are 
enough to start with, — especially as both 
are things you can make right away. In 
fact, neither will take a bit more real skill 
than the doll things you have done. The 
[87] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

only difference is that clothes for yourself 
are bigger and perhaps a little harder to 
manage in the actual holding and sewing. 
But that is only a question of getting used 
to them, — and the way to get used to some- 
thing new is to begin." 

"And may I begin, too, mother?" asked 
Alice. "You know I need those very same 
things." dr 

"Surely, dear," replied Mrs. Gerald, "you 
may work together. I will give all direc- 
tions for one skirt and one kimono or what- 
ever it may be, but you can always know I 
have two girls and their needs in my head. 

"Now let me see," she continued thought- 
fully, "I think we'll begin on a skirt to wear 
with middies. That's not so big, — less actual 
material, I mean, — as a kimono and conse- 
quently is better for a starter. Suppose we 
take our measurements now% and then to- 
morrow, when I am down at the stores, I'll 
get your material. I recall seeing some very 
pretty dark, plaid ginghams the last time 
I was in. How would those suit you ? Ging- 
ham wears well and in this case will be es- 
[88] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

pecially good as the dark plaids will stay 
clean and tidy and, tho very light weight, 
will look not unlike a woolen skirt." 

''That will please me, I know," said Alice 
happily, "and, mother, if you can, will you 
get mine a green and blue plaid,— that's my 
favciite plaid." 

"And mine's gray and black," said Mary 
quickly. "I think a gray and black plaid 
with maybe a thread of green or red is the 
very prettiest plaid I know." 

"I have it down," replied Mrs. Gerald, 
who had promptly whipped out her note 
book and jotted down the girls' directions. 
"Now let's get the amount of goods figured 
out and then I've an idea you'll discover it's 
bed time. Bring me a couple of tape hues, 
Alice, and I'll show you how to take a skirt 
measure. 

"Measure around the waist hne — so — 
28^ inches. Mary, will you please put that 
down for us? Now notice. I tie the tape 
line around your waist just where the belt 
of the skirt will be. Now kneel down and 
[89] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

while kneeling, hold yourself straight and 
tall." 

"Never you inind, Mary," said Alice, as 
she did as she was told, "you'll have to do 
this in a minute and then I'll laugh at you!" 

"Now," continued Mrs. Gerald, "I meas- 
ure from the tied tape line to the floor, — 
that's all, dear; you may get up now, — it's 
24 inches. Then add three inches for extra 
length and three inches for the hem and yo 
have the length the goods should be cut. 
You might be interested to know that little 
folks, — by that I mean girls of five or six 
or seven, — have their skirts made just to the 
floor when they kneel; but girls as old as 
you are add the three inches to make a 
graceful length. 

"So now we can figure up our material. 
Using gingham which is only 27 inches 
wide, we will need three lengths of the goods 
for the skirt, which, at 30 inches a length, 
will mean just 2>4 yards. For the belt we 
must allow 30 inches and we can use it cross- 
wise of the goods because it is merely an 
under belt that does not show. Otherwise 
[90] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

we would have to allow enough to cut it 
lengthwise of the goods. That means tliree 
inches across and then a small three inch 
piece to be sewed on for the extra length. 
Then pockets, — do you want pockets ? They 
won't show with your long smock middies 
but with the short ones they will be very 
convenient." 

The girls decided for pockets, plain ones, 
so Mrs. Gerald continued, "Then we must 
have three yards of gingham for each skirt." 

"But a pocket doesn't take fifteen inches, 
mother," objected Alice, as she hastily 
figured out the amount her mother was to 
get. 

"No, that's true," replied Mrs. Gerald, 
"but gingham always shrinks and we have 
to allow for that. Now while we're on the 
subject, suppose you take down all the direc- 
tions. Then tomorrow you can shrink the 
goods, and it will be ready for work when 
you can sew on Saturday.'* 



[91] 



7 IN. 




POCKET 

UPPER PART O^ BACTK. 

DOTTED LINES SHOW 
HEPT AT PLA.CKET 




FINISHED SKIRT 

Diagram of detail for Skirt. Lesson 8, 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING A 

GINGHAM SKIRT FOR 

MIDDIES. 

Preparing the goods for work : 

Unfold the new goods till it lays out the full width 
and is in loose crosswise folds. 

Immerse in warm salted water in a bathtub (or 
other vessel which is large enough for the goods to 
lie smooth and flat). 

Run the hands back and forth over the goods to be 
sure that every inch is soaked with the water. 

Keep in the water for ten minutes. 

Without touching the goods, draw off the water and 
fill the tub with clear, cold water. 

Leave for ten minutes. 

Without unfolding the goods, hold it firmly in two 
hands and draw it up the side of the tub so the 
water can drain off. Draw off water. 

When the water has drained pretty well away, pull 
the goods over the edge of the tub, being very careful 
to see that every fold lays flat and smooth, and leave 
till dry. This shrinks the gingham, sets the color 
but leaves it new-looking. If the goods is carelessly 
handled, it will have to be pressed and will thus lose 
that pretty new look which is desirable to keep. 

Cutting the skirt: 

See that the end of the goods is cut evenly. 
Measure 30 inches down the right selvage. 

[93] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Measure SO inches down the left selvage and fold 
over till a sharp crease is made. 

Unfold and cut along this crease. 

Lay this piece of goods along the remaining goods 
near the end just cut and fit the plaid together. If 
plain goods were being cut of course one could sim- 
ply cut off the next 30 inches. But plaid goods must 
be matched. If the plaid is a small figure;, there will 
be very little waste. If the plaid is large there may 
be quite a piece wasted. This cannot be helped as 
a skirt made without matching the plaids would be 
a disappointment. 

After the second skirt length is cut, match the third 
length and cut in the same way. 

Cut a S inch strip all the way across for the belt. 

The belt measure for Alice was 28 and 1/^ inches, 
which means the belt must be 30 inches — % inch be- 
ing for the turn-in at each end and 1 inch for the lap. 
Therefore a piece 3 and % inches must be cut and 
sewed onto the 27 inch length — the extra I/2 i^^^ ^^ 
for the seam used in putting the piece on. Mary's 
measure was 26 inches so she did not have to add a 
piece, — the selvage was at each end so no turn-in was 
needed and the extra inch gave her the lap in the back. 

To cut the pockets, cut a paper pattern in a V 
shape, 7 inches along the straight top and 7 inches 
from the center of the top to the tip of the point. See 
Diagram. 

Making the skirt: 

Sew the three breadths together, leaving one seam 
open ten inches from the top. This is for the placket. 

[94] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Make an inch wide hem down the right side of the 
placket. The right side means the side that will be on 
the right side of the back of the skirt when it is worn. 
If the placket was cut thru the goods, as sometimes 
happens, instead of being on the selvage, as it is, both 
sides of the placket would have to be hemmed. 

Lap the inch hem over the other side of the placket 
and sew firmly in place. 

Piece the belt if necessary. 

Find the center of the breadth directly opposite the 
placket. This is the front of the skirt. 

Pin the front of the skirt to the middle of the belt. 

Pin the right hand back to the right hand end of 
belt. 

Pin the left hand back to the left hand end of belt. 

Adjust the fullness between in inch- wide plaits, 
being sure they all are backward-turning. That is, 
those plaits on the right side turn back and those on 
the left turn back. This gives the effect of a box 
plait in the front. It is impossible to give more 
particular directions as belts vary in length; the 
plaits must be adjusted and if necessary readjusted 
till all the fullness is used up and the plaits are 
evenly spaced. Do not try to baste as yet; pin till 
every plait is just right. 

Baste and then sew — using the machine if possible. 

Turn the belt in ^4 inch. 

Fold it over onto the right side and stitch it in 
place. It will be noticed that the belt must turn 
onto the right side of the skirt. 

Sew two hooks and eyes at the back of the belt. 

Try the skirt on and be sure of the length. There 

[95] 



I 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

should be a 3 inch hem. While the skirt is still on 
pin the pockets in place. Measure down from the 
belt and over from the center plaid to be sure they 
are even. Pin each pocket with at least three pins 
to hold firmly. 

Baste pockets and hem. 

Try on again to be sure all is right. 

Stitch pockets and hem and the skirt is finished. 



[96] 




Pin carefully in place, using plenty of pins. Lesson 9. 




TO BUTTON HOLE 
THE NECK 



LESSON 9. 

MAKING A NIGHT GOWN. 

Much to the girls' amazement, they found 
the making of the skirt fully as easy as the 
doll things they had done. In fact, Alice 
insisted that it was easier because it was all 
"straight" work. Mary was not so sure 
about that because she had had some trouble 
getting her plaits just to suit her when she 
put the skirt to the belt, but she had kept 
at the job, pinning and repinning till the 
finished result was exactly right and she was 
[99] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

just as enthusiastic about more work as 
Alice could possibly be. 

"Let's see," said Mrs. Gerald, when ap- 
pealed to as to what should be begun next. 
*'I think you spoke of a kimono, and you 
can make a pretty one, I know. But I be- 
lieve if I were you I'd do something else 
first. A kimono is big and long and has 
sleeves, — all very different from anything 
you have yet done, you see. And if I'm not 
mistaken both you girls need some pretty 
nighties. Why not make at least one night 
gown apiece and get used to handhng a large 
garment? Then you can make a kimono as 
soon as you please." 

Both Alice and Mary thought that a 
reasonable suggestion and as thej^ like all 
other girls, always liked pretty lingerie, they 
began making plans as to how the gowns 
should be made. 

"I'm not going to have regular pink and 

blue stuff on mine," said Alice, first thing; 

"mine's going to be green, pale green. I'm 

going to have smocking, too, — that is, if you 

[100] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

think I can, mother, and do that in green to 
match the rosettes." 

"Pink suits me even if it is more common," 
announced Mary, "only my pink is going to 
be a soft shade of rose. That color makes 
such pretty rosettes." 

"I think you'll find just the colors you'll 
like in my drawer of embroidery threads," 
suggested Mrs. Gerald, "and, as you'll only 
need a few threads of each color, that will 
save you buying a whole skein just for a 
little. You see, that's just the reason I 
always save every thread when I'm thru a 
job of embroidering, — you never can tell 
how glad you'll be to get even three or four 
threads of a certain color. 

"Now let's see about the goods," she con- 
tinued. "Of course I always have some long 
cloth on hand, as I buy a bolt or two every 
January. Mary, stand up here and let's 
measure." 

She laid the tape line on Mary's shoulder 
with the end an inch from the collar line in 
just the middle of the shoulder, — measuring 
the middle from the back and front. 
[101 J 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

"Tell me, Alice," she said, "where it 
touches the floor." 

"At 48 inches," announced Alice. 

"Then the gown must be cut just twice 
that length," said Mrs. Gerald, "for you 
want it about an inch off the floor and the 
inch hem will just do that. Now, Alice, your 
turn." 

Alice's measure was 51 inches, so the girls 
figured that Mary's gown would take 2% 
yards of long cloth and Alice's would need 
just 6 inches more than that, or 2 yards and 
30 inches. 

Mrs. Gerald had plenty of goods, she 
found, and as it was already shrunk the 
girls could go right to work. She was care- 
ful to explain to them that all cotton goods 
must be shrunk before making, otherwise 
there is sure to be disappointment in the fit 
and length. "In fact, girls," she added, "I 
always try to shrink cotton material as soon 
as I get it, then it's ready for use. 

"Now, before I give you directions for 
making the pattern," said Mrs. Gerald, "I 
want you to get out the patterns that you 
[ 102] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER^S HELP 

on the left side of the front, embroider your 
initials in white or rose color." 

Mary liked that plan very much and 
especially was she pleased to have hers dif- 
ferent in some way from her sister's, — it 
made it seem more truly hers. And so they 
set happily to work. 

When the gowns were all finished a couple 
of days later, Mrs. Gerald gave each girl a 
bolt of ribbon 1/4 inch wide, — Alice's pale 
green and Mary's rose, — and taught them 
how to make their rosettes. They un- 
wrapped the ribbon and every three inches 
along the whole length they tied a loose knot. 
The three inches had to be between each 
finished knot. The whole length of ribbon 
was then cut into two parts. The needle 
threaded to match the ribbon was then thrust 
thru the ribbon just half way between 
each knot. This really strung the ribbon on 
the thread, you see, just like little children 
string popcorn. When all of one half the 
bolt of ribbon was on the thread, the knots 
were turned down and several firm stitches 
taken. This gathered the folds of ribbon 
[107 1 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

into a little bunch and made a rosette. The 
second half was made into a rosette in ex- 
actly the same way. 

One rosette was used on the shoulder and 
one at the left of the front. 

So well did the gowns turn out that Mrs. 
Gerald promised she would give them each 
material for a kimono the very next time 
they wanted to sew. 



[1081 




Ctit out this triangle. Lesson 10. 




CUT TWO FACING PIECES 
FOUR INCHES WIDE 



LESSON 10. 



MAKING A KIMONO, 



Mrs. Gerald felt sure that it wouldn't be 
many days before the girls would be sudden- 
ly asking for their kimonos, — ^their notions 
for sewing usually came suddenly, she had 
observed! — so the very next time she went 
down town she purchased the material they 
would need for their work. Alice had men- 
tioned wanting blue crepe, a soft, Copen- 
hagen blue, and Mary had many times spo- 
ken of wanting a rose color negligee, so Mrs. 
[Ill] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Gerald had no doubt as to just what was the 
right thing to get. 

It was lucky she was so before-handed be- 
cause the day after the material was deliv- 
ered Mary announced that there was to be 
an extra teachers' meeting the next after- 
noon and that school would close at noon. 

"And if I only had that goods you prom- 
ised me for my kimono/' she added regret- 
fully, "I could make it up tomorrow.'* 

Mrs. Gerald slipped off into her room and 
when she returned a minute later, handed 
Mary a package with the question, "How 
would this do?" 

Mary's eager fingers made short work of 
the wrapping, and there before her lay yards 
of soft crepe, just the very color she had 
longed for! 

"I thought there'd be a vacation or some- 
thing one of these days," said Mrs. Gerald. 
"I just seemed to feel it coming, so I pre- 
pared for it. I'm glad you like my selec- 
tion." 

"Don't I get any?" asked Alice. "I 
haven't any vacation and that's bad enough, 
[112] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

but if I didn't get any crepe for my kimono, 
that would be worse'/' 

"Indeed it would," replied Mrs. Gerald 
gaily, "and if you like you may console your- 
self by opening the package that's on my 
sewing table. But when you'll make it up 
is more than I see just now." 

Of course Alice was delighted with the 
goods she found, just as Mrs. Gerald had 
known she would be, and she promised then 
and there to make no engagement for Sat- 
urday, so that she, too, could make her kimo- 
no and have the fun of wearing it. 

The next afternoon as soon as the lunch 
work was out of the way, Mrs. Gerald and 
Mary, note book in hand of course, ad- 
journed to the sewing room for kimono- 
making. And these are the directions Mary 
set down in her book, — directions which 
Alice was to copy that very evening so as 
to lose no time from Saturday's working 
hours. 



[113 1 



3 IN aiN 




lYD 


BELT 


li 


1 




$1 q W « 


.._ ... 1 



Di?igram of Patterns for Kimona, Lesson 10. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING A 
KIMONO. 

Material needed: 
4 yards of crepe or other soft material 36 inches 
wide. 

Thread to match, number 50 cotton. 

Method for cutting: 

(See Diagram.) 

Measure from middle of shoulder to length desired 
(almost to floor). 

Add three inches for hem. This made 49 and 1/2 
inches for Mary. 

Double this length, which makes 99 inches or 2 
and % yds. 

Cut off 2 and % yards from the piece. Lay re- 
mainder aside. 

Lay this 2 and % yards smoothly on the table, — 
doubling it crosswise. That is, fold it in half, cross- 
wise. 

Put a pin at the middle of the crosswise fold. 

Put a pin at the middle of the bottom, at the raw 
edge. 

Lay a tape line between these two pins and cut 
along the line. This opens one whole half of the 
goods down the middle. This opening is for the 
front. 

On each side of the pin which is in the crosswise 
fold, measure 3 inches out from the center and put 
pins. 

[115] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Cut along the crosswise fold this six inches. This 
is for the back of the neck. 

Measure along the cut center 2/3 yard from the 
bottom, and put pin (A). 

Hold left hand at that point. With the right hand 
pick up the point of goods at the center of the cross- 
wise fold B and lay it back cornerwise as far as the 
three inch (C) cut will let it go. This lays back 
a long triangle, 3 inches at the smallest side and % 
yard on the other side. 

Cut out this triangle. 

Repeat on other side. 

These two triangles cut out, shape the neck and 
front opening. 

From the remaining goods laid aside cut the two 
sleeve pieces, each 12 inches wide and 44 inches long. 

Cut two facing pieces each 4 inches wide and the 
whole length of the piece which will be about 1 yard 
and 14. 

Cut the belt 4 inches wide and one yard long. 

Method for making: 

Sew the two facing pieces together. 

Put the seam thus made at the neck (middle) the 
right side of the facing next to the wrong side of the 
kimono. 

Sew together as far as facing will go down the 
front. 

Crease facing over and sew onto right side. 

Hem the front of the kimono left below the facing. 

Sew under arm seams beginning at the bottom and 
sewing up one yard onlv. 

[116] 



SEWIxNG WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Slip the kimono on. If side seam "dips," trim off 
about two inches and round off to nothing in the 
front and back. 

Hem three inches around the bottom. 

Take sleeve piece. Sew the two 12 inch ends to- 
gether. 

Hem one side with tiny hem. 

Pin center of sleeve (directly opposite seam D) to 
conter of the opening left in the under arm seam D. 
This center is really the shoulder of the kimono. 

Sew front and back from this pin for 10 inches. 

Hem the rest of the sleeve. It will be seen that 
sleeve is not entirely sewn to the main part of the 
kimono. This makes the sleeve hang loosely and 
gives the real Japanese touch. 

Repeat sewing on other sleeve. 

Make belt. Turn in raw edges. Baste together 
down the whole length and stitch. A Japanese 
kimono belt has square ends but of course the ends 
may be turned in and pointed if it is desired. 

Tack the middle of the belt to the middle of the 
back of the kimono 8 inches below the neck. 

Try on kimono. Lap belt around and mark where 
it crosses in front. 

Sew a pair of snappers where the belt crosses and 
the kimono is finished. 

At first it was pretty hard for Mary to 

understand just how the long straight pieces 

went together, so Mrs. Gerald took the note 

book and right beside the directions drew a 

[117] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

rough sketch to show some idea of how the 
finished kimono would look. That made it 
easy as could be. Mary cut out all the 
pieces, being very careful to do only one 
thing at a time and to be sure she had read 
the directions correctly before she took up 
the scissors to cut. 

Then, when everything was cut out, she 
laid the materials on the big table and made 
them into the shape of the kimono in the 
sketch, — the sleeves doubled as they would 
be when sewed on and the facing laid along 
the edge where it was to be sewed. By so 
doing, she could get an idea just how the 
kimono would look when finished and could 
be sure she wasted no time or material by 
making mistakes. 

After the goods was cut out and planned, 
the actual making took only a little time, 
and when Alice came home from school she 
met Mary proudly parading up and down 
in front of the long glass and wearing — her 
finished kimono! 



[118] 




"Yes I made it all myself." Lesson 11. 




SLIP END OrSTRING 
INTO OPEN ENDOr BELT 

LESSON 11. 

MAKING A COOK'S CAP AND 
APRON. 

Anyone could have guessed by the way 
Alice rushed in the front door, tossed her 
books and sweater on the hall table and 
hurried thru the house in search of her 
mother, that something out of common was 
up. And anyone who guessed that that 
unusual something — whatever it was — 
pleased Alice greatly, would have guessed 
exactly right. 

[m] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

"Mother!'' shouted Alice eagerly, when 
she came upon her mother in the sewing 
room, "what do you s'pose? Our cooking 
class is to have an exhibition luncheon and 
I've been made chairman of the whole 
thing, and we're to plan the luncheon and 
buy the food and cook it and serve it and 
everything, and a committee of teachers are 
to be our guests and pass on the perfection 
of the luncheon, — and I'm chairman, — and 
— oh, yes! and I have to have a cook's cap 
and apron, and, please, may we make one 
right away?" And there she stopped, not 
because everything had been said, but be- 
cause she had run out of breath. 

Mrs. Gerald was hearty in her congratu- 
lations ; any honor to one of her girls pleased 
her more than an honor to herself, and she 
was proudly sure that Alice could do the 
chairmanship work to which she had been 
assigned. 

"Of course you shall have a cook's cap 
and apron," she said, "a brand new one, 
too, and we'll make it just as soon as pos- 
[ 1S2] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

sible. By the way, when is the luncheon, 
dear?" 

"Next Wednesday," answered Alice. 
"You see, every day the rest of this week 
we're to practice making menus and study 
market prices and all that, and then we have 
two lessons on setting the table. That will 
give me a chance to see who's best at each 
job, so when I appoint my sub-committees 
I can get the right girl in the right place." 

"You have the idea," laughed Mrs. Ger- 
ald, "that's the secret of success, — get the 
right girl in the right place. Inasmuch as 
you have that much time, I believe you'd 
better not try to make your cap and apron 
before Saturday. That will give me time 
to buy your material and to work out a pat- 
tern for you. For I haven't made an apron 
of that kind in a long time and I want to be 
sure yours is exactly right." 

It was a good thing that Alice didn't count 
on doing any sewing after school during that 
week, for she was more than busy visiting- 
markets, making out committees and plan- 



nAlN PART OF APRON 



31 IN 



«o STRAPS FOR SHOULDERS 

'^ 2 2 IN. 



& IN 51N SIN 



25 IN 




FINISHED APRON 

Diagram of Patterns for Cook*s Cap and Apron. Les- 
son 11. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

niiig for the big day that was to come. But 
she saved Saturday morning for the sewing 
and just as soon as the breakfast work was 
done, she and her mother went to the sewing 
room ready for work. 

These are the directions which Mrs. Ger- 
ald had worked out ready for Ahce to take 
down in her book: 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING A 
COOK'S CAP AND APRON. 

Material needed : 
2 yards of cambric or nainsook one yard wide. 
Number 60 white cotton thread. 

6 inches of white cotton elastic 14 i'^ch wide. 

Method of cutting: 

a. Apron. 
(See Diagram.) 

See that one end of the material is perfectly 
straight. To be sure of this it may be necessary 
to pull a thread and trim off unevenness by that. 

Measure from the even end 25 inches. 

Snip the selvage at this point. 

Hold the cloth at each side of the snipped place 
firmly and with a quick firm motion tear off the 
25 inch piece. This is the main part of the apron. 

Along one selvage of the remaining piece measure 

[125] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

31 inches and tear in exactly eight inches. It is best 
to measure in the eight inches; mark with a lead 
pencil and tear very slowly till the mark is reached. 

From the end of the goods measure in eight inches 
and snip. 

Tear down from this point till the first pencil mark 
is reached. This gives you a piece of the goods 8 
inches by 31 inches. * 

Tear this eight inch piece exactly in half length- 
wise. This gives you two strips 4 inches by 3\ 
inches ; these are the strings that go over the shoulder. 

In just the same manner, tear a piece 7 inches by 
27 inches. 

Tear this strip exactly in half and you have two 
strips each 3 and % inches by 27 inches. These are 
the strings that tie in the back, at the belt. 

Next tear a strip 22 inches long and 4 inches wide. 
This is the belt. 

From the remaining piece (using the little scraps 
as far as possible so that the biggest section may be 
left for the cap) cut one square 8 inches by 8 inches 
and two squares 5 inches by 5 inches. The 8 inch 
square is the bib and the 5 inch squares are the 
pockets. 

b. Cap, 
(See Diagram.) 

Measure 16 inches along the crosswise edge. 

Measure 15 along the lengthwise edge. 

Tear or cut out this square. (We call it a square 
fst convenience tho i^ '«/*« an inch of being a per- 
fect square.) 

[1S6) 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Fold in half lengthwise. 

Round off one set of corners till the whole piece, 
when unfolded looks like what would be cut out of a 
letter U. That is, two corners are rounded and two 
are left square. 

Cut a straight strip 16 inches long and 6 inches 
wide. This is the flap of the cap. 

Method of making: 
a. Apron. 

Baste a three inch hem in the main part of the 
apron. 

Stitch the hem. 

Gather the top of the apron till the whole width 
is gathered into 18 inches. 

Put the apron onto the belt, first putting the belt 
on the wrong side then turning it over onto the right. 
Leave the ends of the belt open. 

Turn a one inch hem at end of string and stitch 
or hem in place. 

Make a narrow hem down each long side. 

Repeat with the other string. 

Fold the raw edge of the string into 3 tiny folds 
and slip into place at the opened end of the belt. 
Stitch firmly with at least three rows of stitching. 

Repeat, putting the second string at the opposite 
end of the belt. 

Hem the pockets 1 inch. 

Crease a ^ inch turn-in on three sides of the 
pocket. 

[127] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Try the apron on and pin the pockets where de- 
sired. They should be just where the hand con- 
veniently /alls. 

Stitch the pockets in place, being very careful to 
fasten the thread firmly at the top; otherwise the 
pockets will easily rip off. 

Hem the bib 2 inches along a crosswise side: this 
is the top. 

Gather the lower edge. 

Make a I/4 inch turn-in along both long edges 
and across one short edge of each string — shoulder 
string is now meant. 

Baste together across the end and for 25 inches 
down the long side. This makes a string 1 and % 
inches wide. 

Set the bib into the 6 inches remaining open and 
baste firmly in place. 

Sew the second shoulder string the same way mak- 
ing the bib connect the two in front. 

Stitch down the folded side of the string as well as 
down the turned-in side. This stitching gives a neat, 
tailored look and also makes the apron iron much 
better than as if the stitching were along only one 
side. 

Open the belt by cutting along the top for 4 inches 
each way from the center. 

Turn in the edge thus cut 1/4 inch. 

Set the bib and shoulder strings — stitched together 
as they now are, — into this opening. 

Baste firmly and then stitch and the apron is fin- 
ished. 

[128] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 
b. Cap, 

Hem the straight edge of the cap piece with a % 
inch hem. 

Gather the U-shaped edge till it measures 16 
inches. This will make the piece cup up in cap shape. 

Set the flap onto this gathered edge, stitching it 
into place with a narrow, French seam. 

Hem the flap on three sides. If the long side of 
the flap was cut on the selvage, it will be necessary 
to hem only the ends. 

Run a 6 inch strip of l^ inch wide white elastic in 
the hem of the U-shaped piece and sew it firmly at 
each end. This gathers the cap back and holds it 
on the head. 

Turn the flap half way back and crease firmly. 

Alice was glad she had spent many hours 
learning to run the machine well, for, al- 
tho of course she could have made a very 
nice apron by hand, a cook's apron has much 
more style to it when stitched. She decided 
to baste everything before she stitched it 
because even tho she was a pretty good 
stitcher, it takes longer to rip out a mistake 
than to baste in the beginning, and she had 
no time to waste. 

Thanks to her care in cutting and basting, 
[129] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

she progressed rapidly with her work and 
did not have to rip out and puzzle over one 
single thing. The whole apron just went 
together as easily as could be imagined. 

And on the day of the luncheon, when the 
apron was all smartly starched and ironed, 
she was proud to say in answer to the many 
questions, "Yes, thank you, I'm so glad you 
like my apron, because I made it myself and 
I'll be glad to show you howT' 



[1301 




e.iV-1 c:o'b«»^»^e_ 



dips under the 



arms trim off." 



i 


^^J 


i 


ii 


m 


ni/fi 


_. 


.r. 


LAYPATTERNSFOR 



COLLAR CUFFAND POCKET 



LESSON 12. 

MAKING A 'SLIP-ON" HOUSE 
DRESS. 

Mary sat in the big window seat and 
turned over the pages of her sewing note 
book. 

"Learning to sew is like climbing a lad- 
der," she said thoughtfully, "you think you 
can't possibly step to the top round but you 
find that if you take the first step and then 
after that the second step and then the third 
and then the fourth, it all goes very easily, 
[ 133] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

and the first thing you know you're at the 
top where you thought you couldn't go. I 
think that's very wonderful." 

"It is, dear," answered Mrs. Gerald; 
''that's doubly true. It's true of each thing 
you make, — one step at a time brings you 
straight for the finish, — and it's true of the 
whole thing; begin with an easy garment, 
then do a harder and a harder and a harder 
and first thing you know you can make, — 
well, a dress maybe." 

"Oh, could we really?" asked Mary eager- 
ly. "I was wondering only a minute ago 
what I'd like to make next. I've the two 
night gowns and the kimono and an apron 
like Alice made. I'd love to make a dress 
and I know Alice would, too. Could it be 
a school dress?" 

Mrs. Gerald thought a minute. **No," 
she decided, "I think not. For one thing, 
it would be better to pick out a pretty design 
and buy a pattern to make it by. I can make 
patterns for plain things, but I think it's 
much better to buy a paper pattern when it 
comes to making a school dress. Then, too, 
[134] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

summer is coming and you know how you 
enjoy wearing a house dress on the warm 
summer mornings." 

"Yes," agreed Mary, "they're so comfy 
and easy to put on." 

"Just so," said Mrs. Gerald. "So I sug- 
gest that you make a house dress first and 
try your hand. Then, if you're success- 
ful——" 

"And of course I will be," interrupted 
Mary. 

"To be sure," replied Mrs. Gerald, smil- 
ing, "then you may buy a pattern and make 
anything you wish. I'll not be afraid to 
put you in the graduating class!" 

"Goody!" exclaimed jNIary, laughing 
gaily, "then let's plan the dress now while 
there's time before dinner. You can get the 
goods for me sometime, mother, if you 
please; and I'll start cutting it out the next 
time I can take for sewing." 

Mrs. Gerald was willing, so Mary took 
her pencil and wrote down the directions 
at once. 

[ 135 ] 



ONE-HALF^ OP COLLAR PIECE 
3^1 IN 




- /POCKET 



5 V-^ \N 



FINISHED 
DRESS 



Diagram of Patterns for Slip-on House Dress. Les- 



12. 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING A 
SLIP-ON HOUSE DRESS. 

Material needed: 

2 and % yards of white material, such as lawn, 1 
yard wide. 

1 yard of colored material, such as percale, to trim. 
Number 60 white thread. 

The day before cutting, shrink white material, and 
shrink and set tlie color of the colored material ac- 
cording to directions given before. The 2 and % 
yards length should allow ample for shrinkage unless 
a very long dress is desired. 

Method of cutting pattern: 

Get out and read directions for making a night 
gown pattern. This dress can be cut by that same 
pattern if folds are laid in the paper to shorten the 
length. Or, if desired, a new pattern may be cut 
just the length needed for the dress. 

To get dress length; kneel and measure from the 
shoulder to the floor. Add 3 inches to this length 
and another 3 inches for the hem. 

a. Cuff. 
(See Diagram.) 

Cut a piece of paper 17 inches long and 3 and V2 
inches wide. 

Fold in half, crosswise. 

Measure 2 inches along the 3 and Vo inch side. 
Mark A. 

[137] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Mark B at the center of the folded edge. 

Draw a line from A to B and cut along this line. 

Unfold. 

6. Pocket. 
(See Diagram.) 

Take a piece of paper 8 inches by 10 inches. 

Fold in half, lengthwise. 

Draw a line from the center at the end of the 
fold to the opposite corner. Cut along this line and 
unfold. This makes a triangle 8 inches on one side 
and a little over 10 inches on the other two. 

c. Collar Piece. 
(See Diagram.) 

Take a piece of paper 15 inches by 13 inches. 

Fold in half lengthwise. 

Along the fold measure down 4 and 1/2 inches and 
mark A. 

From the bottom of the fold measure up 3 inches 
and mark B. 

Mark the upper right hand corner D. 

From D measure down G inches and mark C. 

From C draw a slightly curved line to the corner 
below B. 

From C measure in 3 inches and mark E. 

Draw a slightly curving line (parallel to the line 
drawn from C to the lower corner) from B to E. 

Continue this line, rounding the corner, to A. 

Cut along lines draAvn and unfold. 

To cut material: 
Fold the white goods in half, crosswise, and pin 
[138] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

pattern in place. Notice carefully that shoulder is on 
the crosswise fold of the goods. 

Cut out. 

Cut belt. Measure 5 and 14 inches in from the 
selvage. 

Tear down the whole yard length of the goods. 

On the remaining piece lay patterns for collar, 
cuff, and pocket, remembering to double the goods 
under the cuft' and pocket patterns so that :wo are 
cut Be sure that all have the long way of the pat« 
tern on the long way of the goods. 

Cut out. 

Method of making dress: 

Fold the white piece in half lengthwise and crease 
for 12 inches from the neck both front and back. 

Fold the colored collar piece and crease the center 
line also. 

Lay the white piece out on the table flat and lay 
the collar piece on top of the white at the neck. Fit 
carefully, being sure that the crease in the colored 
piece exactly fits into the crease in the white piece. 

Pin into place. 

After it is carefully pinned shape the neck of the 
white goods to fit the neck of the colored collar piece, 
cutting carefully. 

Baste around the neck and stitch. 

Turn the colored goods over onto the other side of 
the white. 

Crease a ^4 inch turn-in all jyoond the raw edge 
of the collar piece. 

[1391 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Baste the collar piece down onto the white goods, 
being very sure that the point is exactly on the center 
crease in the front and that the middle of the back is 
on the middle crease in the back. 

Stitch in place. 

Sew the straight edge of the cuff to the end of the 
sleeve on the wrong side. 

Crease a 1/4 ^^^^ turn-in on the raw edges of the 
cuff. 

Turn the cuff up onto the sleeve and baste in place. 

Stitch along the two long sides. 

Repeat with the other cuff. 

Seam the dress together, making the underarm 
seams with small, French seams. 

Try on and if the dress proves correct thus far, 
as it should, take off and turn up the three-inch hem. 
If it "dips" under the arms, trim oft", and try on 
again. 

Stitch the hem. 

Make a 1 inch hem on the 8 inch side of the 
pockets. 

Slip the dress on and mark where pockets should 
be put. 

Pin in place, using at least three pins. 

Baste on and then stitch, being careful as before, 
to fasten the thread carefully at the tops of the 
pockets so the pockets do not easily rip. 

Turn in 1/4 inch all around the belt piece. 

Fold together, doubling the long way, and baste. 
If pointed endb are desired, turn in points as the 
basting is done. 

Stitch one or two rows all around the belt. 

[HO] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

Put a snapper at the front where the belt crosses. 

Tack the belt to the middle of the back of the dress 
about 12 inches below the neck. 

Try on and if everything is correct the dress is 
ready to wear. 



After much looking at samples which 
Mrs. Gerald brought home from her next 
trip to the stores, Mary chose a cross- 
barred dimity for the dress and a percale, 
striped in two shades of rose, for the trim- 
ming. Alice (who, of course, decided to 
make a house dress, too) chose plain lawn 
with a trimming of plain yellow percale, a 
very pretty shade of which ^Irs. Gerald 
had found. 

JNIary felt very big and important while 
making her dress, and indeed, isnt it a big 
and important job to make your first dress? 
And when it was all finished, she was proud 
to display it to her father and get his hearty, 
*^Well done, little girl!" 

Alice made her dress only a week or two 
after Mary made hers, and found it so 
pretty and dainty and comfortable that she 
* [Ml] 



SEWING WITHOUT MOTHER'S HELP 

decided to have two, the second trimmed in 
blue. And best of all, the girls so carefully 
set the color before they made the dresses, 
that they wore them the whole summer long 
without a bit of fading to mar the good 
looks of the trimming. 

Mrs. Gerald was proud of her graduates, 
and they celebrated their graduation by 
buying a real pattern and each making a 
dress of their very favorite design. 

"I think our sew^ing course was the best 
ever, mother," said Alice, as she finished up 
this second dress, "and I know my allow- 
ance is going to stretch twice as far, now 
that I can make some of my own clothes!" 



[14^] 



SUGGESTIONS 

OF 

RELATIVES AND FRIENDS 

FOB 

BIRTHDAY, CHRISTMAS, AND 

OTHER HOLIDAY GIFTS 

MAY BE WRITTEN ON THE FOL 

LOWING PAGES 



BY 



THE OWNER OF THIS BOOK 



HEART-SHAPED FAVORS TO 
MAKE FOR A ST. VALEN- 
TINE'S PARTY 



[ !*•'> ] 



PATTERNS TO SEW ON PLACE 

CARDS FOR WASHINGTON'S 

BIRTHDAY 



[ IW 1 



HOW TO DRESS AND CROWN A 
MAY QUEEN 



[ 1 1^ ] 



PRETTY RIBBON DECORATIONS 
FOR A SUMMER FROCK 



[US] 



BIRTHDAY GIFTS FROM BITS 
OF SILK 



[ 149 ] 



A BRAIDED BUG OR A SILK 
QUILT FROM OLD NECKTIES 



[150] 



TIXY CHRISTMAS GIFTS TO 
ENCLOSE IX ENVELOPES 



r 1 >i 1 



SfSlSSSi^l 







ln„T:°'^ONGBBSS 




° 014 145 750